Review: MACKMYRA Brukswhisky – #41 hit

BrukswhiskyI am from the old school; skeptical of anything produced outside Scotland and claiming to be whisky. Several times my mistrust has been confirmed especially by unfortunate experiences with Japanese whisky. So naturally I have been avoiding Mackmyra ever since its introduction in Sweden 2010. There was no doubt in my mind that this was just another feeble monkey-see-monkey-do attempt to copy the unexcelled art of producing single malt scotch. So do I think they succeeded?

I guess it was just a question of time before I had to give Mackmyra a try. Especially considering its broad success in Sweden. So when a close relative offered me a glass the other day I did not decline. Luckily so, because this is not bad whisky in any way. On the contrary it brings something rather new to the wide collection of single malts with already established names. Even though it packs a big alcoholic punch Mackmyra succeeds in delivering various floral notes in a very light and subtle way. The floral notes are also accompanied by dried fruits most notably apple and citrus in a well balanced fashion. I would label this as a summer whisky because of its light and fresh character and can warmly recommend it to people who want to try something different from scotch.

VERDICT: Did they succeed? I would say yes with minor objections. I like the myriad of floral and fruity notes. This is something I have not experienced in many other whiskies. On the negative side it is very light bodied, almost watery, and does pack somewhat of a punch. Still I would definitely go for a Swedish than Japanese whisky if I had nothing else to choose from.

  (6.2/10)

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Review – NIKKA YOICHI 10yo – #62 hit

Masataka Taketsuru, the founder of Japanese whisky, established the first Japanese distillery in 1924. Several people had attempted the art of producing whisky from corn and rice before him but had all failed. In 1934 Masataka Taketsuru opened Yoichi 50km west of Sapporo city, a distillery that has continued to use old Scottish traditions until this very day. Whereas most distilleries have abandoned the aYoichi 10yort of heating pot stills with coal fire this is still common practice in Yoichi.  In 1952 Masataka Taketsuru adopted the name Nikka Whisky and 17 years later he established his second distillery.

They could have fooled me. If blindfolded I would never have guessed that this single malt originated from the other side of the world. When that is said I do not have anything special to say about this dram. It is soft and has a good balance between dried fruits and oak but lacks character.

VERDICT: Not particularly bad but not exceptional in any way either.

  (5.1/10)